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Thread: HDTV = Monitor?

  1. #1
    Soulwalker Cerranos's Avatar
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    Default HDTV = Monitor?

    I'm a bit curious about one thing... my fiance would like to use her 26" HDTV as a computer monitor, but I know that HDTV's don't quite have the resolution that a pc monitor has - is that the same with refresh rates?

    I guess my question is: would her HDTV suffice as a computer monitor? (she's currently using a 22" Acer)

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    Telaran live2wel's Avatar
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    can she use it ...YES
    is it gonna look as good as her monitor? Probably not

  3. #3
    Champion of Telara Forum Troll's Avatar
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    Average monitors are 1920x1080.

    Average HD tv is 1920x1080.

    Average monitor refresh rate is 60hz.

    Average HDTV refresh rate is 60hz.

    There is very little difference between the two.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Forum Troll View Post
    Average monitors are 1920x1080.

    Average HD tv is 1920x1080.

    Average monitor refresh rate is 60hz.

    Average HDTV refresh rate is 60hz.

    There is very little difference between the two.
    As mentioned by the previous poster:

    An HDTV is basically a monitor with tuners and post-procession capabilities. Just make sure you run the TV in "game-mode". This will make sure you get the picture put out 1:1, without the post-processing stuff, which introduces input lag (the TV takes up to a sec to process the pictures, which isn't an issue with TV broadcasts.)

    Also, many TVs only support resolutions of up to 1366x768 through the analogue VGA input. Use an HDMI connection, if your PC doesn't have it, use a DVI to HDMI adaptor, they're around $20 to buy.

  5. #5
    Soulwalker Cerranos's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mandarb View Post
    As mentioned by the previous poster:

    An HDTV is basically a monitor with tuners and post-procession capabilities. Just make sure you run the TV in "game-mode". This will make sure you get the picture put out 1:1, without the post-processing stuff, which introduces input lag (the TV takes up to a sec to process the pictures, which isn't an issue with TV broadcasts.)

    Also, many TVs only support resolutions of up to 1366x768 through the analogue VGA input. Use an HDMI connection, if your PC doesn't have it, use a DVI to HDMI adaptor, they're around $20 to buy.
    I'm going to have to get the DVI/HDMI adaptor since the HDTV only has a VGA input. So it may just use a max of 1366x768 like you mentioned.

    Thanks!

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    Rift Disciple Vengeful_Giblets's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mandarb View Post
    As mentioned by the previous poster:

    An HDTV is basically a monitor with tuners and post-procession capabilities. Just make sure you run the TV in "game-mode". This will make sure you get the picture put out 1:1, without the post-processing stuff, which introduces input lag (the TV takes up to a sec to process the pictures, which isn't an issue with TV broadcasts.)

    Also, many TVs only support resolutions of up to 1366x768 through the analogue VGA input. Use an HDMI connection, if your PC doesn't have it, use a DVI to HDMI adaptor, they're around $20 to buy.
    ^ Yep. I used an HDTV for my computer's monitor for quite awhile. Any resolution that the TV supports will be something that your video card can handle. That TV is now being used as the monitor on a family member's computer.

    Just make sure that you don't force the TV into a resolution or refresh rate that the TV does not support. You'll get a screen that's fuzzy and / or otherwise difficult to see or that's hard on the eyes. It could also look washed out. Forcing something like this on the TV (or any display) has the potential of damaging the display.

    Some TVs that are advertised as 1080i are not 1920x1080. If something seems odd about the picture then try 1680x1050.
    I bought "Rift: Planes of Telara". Not "Raid: Dungeons of Telara". Account cancelled.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cerranos View Post
    I'm going to have to get the DVI/HDMI adaptor since the HDTV only has a VGA input. So it may just use a max of 1366x768 like you mentioned.

    Thanks!
    Just that we don't understand us wrong, your TV has a HDMI input? And your Computer has a DVI output? If yes, then, go ahead. If you can answer is yes, you're correct in purchasing the adaptor. If your TV doesn't have an HDMI input and only a VGA input, you will need to go with a simple VGA cable.

    If your TV has an HDMI input and your PC a HDMI output, just buy a HDMI cable

  8. #8
    Soulwalker
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    Remember that TV's have MUCH higher contrast then computer monitors so you will basically feel like you've burned your retinas out if you play a lot unless reduce the setting.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Shaddarah View Post
    Remember that TV's have MUCH higher contrast then computer monitors so you will basically feel like you've burned your retinas out if you play a lot unless reduce the setting.
    Not really. The factory settings in some TVs is just so that they accentuate blacks, i.e, you lose a lot of shades of "black" and dark parts where you should still be able to see some details, are just a back inky wall. It's supposed to make the image look richer. It does, on first clance. On second glance, when you watch Lord of the Rings when they are in the mines of Moria, or The Dark Knight, then you're going to bang your head against the wall, because the picture is just one black pool. Sadly, most of them also lack the ability to adjust said settings, unless you can somehow access the service calibration menu.

    If you're referring to contrast ratios of 6'000'000 - 9'000'000 to 1, then that's dynamic contrast. And dynamic contrast simply means: They turn up the backlighting, show white, take a measure point, dimm the backlighting to the lowest setting it can achieve during use, turn the LCD black, take another measure point. Voilą, 9'000'000 to 1 contrast ratio. It's obvious that a TV cannot achieve this during normal use, as, whenever you have a picture to show, you will have a mix of darker and brighter spots, which means the backlighting cannot fully switch off. Else you'd see nothing. Even modern LCD LEDs (Edge lit, Full-LED with local dimming is something a bit different, but there's few of them on the market) don't have much better contrast ratios than modern LCDs using the same "generation" LCD panel. (Also, notice how I try not to lead you into thinking that LED is something entirely new, it's just a different kind of backlighting for a LCD panel which allows it to become much thinner. Which is what customers crave )

    And not all TV manufacturers have the settings as cranked up for "home" use as they have for "showroom" use. In the store, with other TVs to compare right next to them, they need to look brighter and livelier ;)

  10. #10
    Ascendant Masta Squidge's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shaddarah View Post
    Remember that TV's have MUCH higher contrast then computer monitors so you will basically feel like you've burned your retinas out if you play a lot unless reduce the setting.
    My monitor is 70000:1 (so says the box).

    My TV is 50000:1 according to the box. I fail to see your truth. Also, people spend hours and hours watching a TV.. Higher contrast is a GOOD thing.

    Of course dynamic and actual contrast arent the same as what the box says on it.
    Last edited by Masta Squidge; 03-18-2011 at 02:46 PM.

  11. #11
    Telaran DwsPrime's Avatar
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    I use my 58" plasma everyday as my Rift Monitor. It works great, looks fantastic and it HELPS my eyes relax so they aren't so red after 5-6 hrs of play.
    Last edited by DwsPrime; 03-18-2011 at 02:48 PM. Reason: rockstar
    playing since Beta on DwsPrime aka PrimeTime and now aka PrimusMaximus

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