Closed Thread
Results 1 to 15 of 15

Thread: Guide to speaking Old English (medieval era)

  1. #1
    Sword of Telara iAmDeathSpank's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Uranus, Milky Way
    Posts
    893

    Default Guide to speaking Old English (medieval era)

    •START WITH THE BASICS- The Old-English (O.E.) language is just that, old. No one talks that way anymore. But what if you found yourself in a century when they did speak this language? As with learning any new language, you have to start with the basics. "Yes" and "No" vs. O.E. "Yea" and "Nay." "Goodbye" vs. O.E. "Good day" or "God be with ye." The simple forms of communication will get you off to a great start.

    •2
    AVOID WORDS THAT WILL OFFEND- Be careful that you aren't offensive! If you were to walk up to a man/woman in the early Medieval times and tell them they look nice, you are in fact telling them they look "foolish." The same with the word "pretty," which meant "cunning and tricky" until the late 1400s.

    •3
    WATCH OUT FOR MODERN WORDS AND PHRASES- Every word has a history, and original meaning. Words traveled from all over the globe and had to become known and popular before they were recognized. For instance, "hello" is the adaption for the 16th century word "hollo," (which was the shout to grab someone's attention), and was not recorded until the late 19th century. And you wouldn't go around Medieval England spouting phrases like "I'm going to brain you," or "you've got to be kidding me."

    •4
    BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY- So, you begin learning a language by starting with the basics, and now its time to build your vocabulary. What are some of the most common phrases you would need to know when visiting a foreign country? You couldn't ask someone in Medieval England "Where's the bathroom?" because, most likely, they'd point you to a nearby river for you the bathe in. How would you communicate that you needed help if you were injured? Good news! "Help" is in the O.E. language. However, "hurt" wasn't until the 1200s. Use something more simple like "sick" or "wounded." Try to keep to the more simple words, that is always the best when you are unsure what is appropriate.

    •5
    THROW AWAY CONTRACTIONS- We might be lazy with the English language today by shortening words like "do not" to "don't" and "you would" to "you'd." Do not use it here! Keep everything flowing and full. The contractions of past centuries are not the same as those we use today. For example "It is" was often contracted to "'Tis" and so on.

    •6
    FROM THE NOBLES TO THE COMMONERS- It is important to learn your history. The upper class did not speak as the lower, common folk did. After the invasion of the Anglo-Saxons into England, you'll notice the nobles spoke more French, while the lower classes spoke English. Remember that the lower class are not as educated, and that includes the way they speak. Everyone in Medieval England substituted "you" with "ye," upper class included.

    •7
    READ- Look at documents and letters written in Old English. Notice the spellings. People wrote how they thought a word sounded, rather than how they'd been told was the proper way to spell it. Notice words like "Always"-which were not used in this form until 1350-and how in O.E. this was actually two words "Ealne Weg." It means the same thing, but it completely different from how we see and spell the word today.

    •8
    JOURNAL IT- It is important to write down whenever you learn something new about a word. Keep it in a notebook so you can have it handy to review. This way you aren't having to research it every time you want to use it. Find online resources and dictionaries that record the historical information of words and bookmark it.

    •9
    LISTEN AND CONSIDER- Listen to how you talk and the words you use. Study the differences and think about how you might say it differently so that the same message gets across to someone from the 900s. You might think of a phrase you want to say and find that none of the words will work, so try to change it around completely, and try from another angle, to see if you can't make it work. "I worry about your safety." vs. "I care for you to be well."



    Read more: How to Speak Old English in the Medieval Times (The Beginners Guide) | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/how_2260800_engl...#ixzz15vHeA72M
    ------------------------------------------------------------------
    I EXPECT EVERYBODY ON RIFT TO TALK LIKE THIS BY THE TIME IT IS RELEASED, SO START PRACTICING
    Last edited by iAmDeathSpank; 11-21-2010 at 05:30 AM.

  2. #2
    Prophet of Telara Skythe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Candy moutain
    Posts
    1,031

    Default

    i call both troll and copypasta.
    It is an ironic habit of human beings to run faster when we have lost our way.
    -Me? I am Someone, Somebody. Anybody. Anyone.

  3. #3
    Plane Walker Kintega's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    New Jersey, USA
    Posts
    402

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Skythe View Post
    i call both troll and copypasta.
    Nope, it's just regular old Deathspank.
    Halcyon Legion: now offering candy and rainbows! Also, I love writing poetry Ask!
    "When we built these dreams on sand... How they all slipped through our hands; And this might be our only chance! Let's take this one day at a time - I'll hold your hand if you hold mine... The time that we kill keeps us alive." Rise Against - Rumors of My Demise Have Been Greatly Exaggerated

  4. #4
    Prophet of Telara Skythe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Candy moutain
    Posts
    1,031

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Kintega View Post
    Nope, it's just regular old Deathspank.
    My point exactly.
    It is an ironic habit of human beings to run faster when we have lost our way.
    -Me? I am Someone, Somebody. Anybody. Anyone.

  5. #5
    Telaran Sykriar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Washington
    Posts
    52

    Default

    Lol Deathspank. You're so silly.

    /starts writing everything down.

  6. #6
    Ascendant rabb1t's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Bay Area, CA
    Posts
    2,459

    Default

    While interesting, Rift is it's own world, not old-school Earth. Always boggles my mind when peeps pull in old English into something and think they are RPing for that world.
    **Canceled Oct '11, cannot reply on forums. Contact me through my site.**
    rabb1t.com - pc gaming hardware tech talk for everyone / rabb1t's ramblings podcast
    rabb1t's Gamer Day 2010 After Party videos
    joo can has Rift iPhone 4 and Droid wallpapers


  7. #7
    Soulwalker Elspeth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    21

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rabb1t View Post
    While interesting, Rift is it's own world, not old-school Earth. Always boggles my mind when peeps pull in old English into something and think they are RPing for that world.
    Very much this. As always, the most surefire way to ensure that you speaking appropriately, is to take a look at the NPC dialogue. Easy, right? I wonder why more do not do that.

  8. #8
    Shield of Telara Martie's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Sweden
    Posts
    740

    Default

    The ignore fuction works very well I have to say

  9. #9
    Ascendant rabb1t's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Bay Area, CA
    Posts
    2,459

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Elspeth View Post
    ...the most surefire way to ensure that you speaking appropriately, is to take a look at the NPC dialogue. Easy, right? I wonder why more do not do that.
    I've always wondered that myself. An even easier way is to not speak differently at all - just don't pull real world things into the game (basketball scores for example) and do emotes.

    I've actually been 'recognized' in different bodies in games because of my comments and emote style. (As in I was once asked by a player if I knew such-n-such because we had a very similar emote/comment style. What the other player didn't know was that the character he was talking about was also me. ) An 'is that all you got?' and a 'rude' or a 'bring it! /point' here and there and you'd be surprised how noticible you become as a 'character' in the world.

    (I have to say though that the most fun I had RPing by emotes and comment style was as a "Sidekick" in City of Heroes. I was playing a teen peep who was in training and did lots of very 'Robin' style comments. 'Holy pile of junk!' Check out my fist to your face style!... HIYAH!' 'Where's mr. big shoulders?' etc.)

    I was actually completely shocked when I was playing a bard in Vanguard and had macro keys that did my song and did a group saying (like the one I have below). Someone said he'd never actually heard a bard sing before. I was like 'srsly? How does the group know when you are doing important buffs or changing the song effects?'

    Boggles the mind how hard people TRY to role play when it actually requires so little effort.
    **Canceled Oct '11, cannot reply on forums. Contact me through my site.**
    rabb1t.com - pc gaming hardware tech talk for everyone / rabb1t's ramblings podcast
    rabb1t's Gamer Day 2010 After Party videos
    joo can has Rift iPhone 4 and Droid wallpapers


  10. #10
    Rift Disciple lyral's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    115

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rabb1t View Post
    I was actually completely shocked when I was playing a bard in Vanguard and had macro keys that did my song and did a group saying (like the one I have below). Someone said he'd never actually heard a bard sing before. I was like 'srsly? How does the group know when you are doing important buffs or changing the song effects?'

    Boggles the mind how hard people TRY to role play when it actually requires so little effort.
    I actually had the entire March of Cambreadth song set to Macro's in eq2 for random bored times running around on my Troubadour. (for those that have never heard it) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jFi7b...eature=related

    Playing in DAOC on one the RP servers way back when I would see ppl who would actually report you because you didn't talk Elizabethan or named your infiltrator something like Nightblade.

  11. #11
    Sword of Telara iAmDeathSpank's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Uranus, Milky Way
    Posts
    893

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by lyral View Post
    I actually had the entire March of Cambreadth song set to Macro's in eq2 for random bored times running around on my Troubadour. (for those that have never heard it) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jFi7b...eature=related

    Playing in DAOC on one the RP servers way back when I would see ppl who would actually report you because you didn't talk Elizabethan or named your infiltrator something like Nightblade.
    Thats stupid

  12. #12
    Plane Walker Taldier's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    290

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by iAmDeathSpank View Post

    START WITH THE BASICS- The Old-English (O.E.) language is just that, old. No one talks that way anymore. But what if you found yourself in a century when they did speak this language? As with learning any new language, you have to start with the basics. "Yes" and "No" vs. O.E. "Yea" and "Nay." "Goodbye" vs. O.E. "Good day" or "God be with ye." The simple forms of communication will get you off to a great start.
    ...
    Atleast steal the work of someone who knows what they are talking about. It isnt old english, its Elizabethan english, or more correctly "Early Modern English" (and a fairly poor guide to early modern english at that). This was the form of the english language used in the works of Shakespeare in the 16th century.

    Old English is what the original Beowulf was written in, I've yet to see anyone attempt to roleplay like this in a game:

    Hwt! wē Gār-Dena in ġeār-dagum, ēod-cyninga, rym ġefrūnon, hū ā elingas ellen fremedon. Oft Scyld Scēfing sceaena rēatum, monegum mǣġum, meodosetla oftēah, egsode eorlas. Syan ǣrest wear fēasceaft funden, hē s frōfre ġebād, wēox under wolcnum, weormyndum āh, ot him ǣġhwylc āra ymbsittendra ofer hronrāde hȳran scolde, gomban gyldan. t ws gōd cyning!

    Yes, that is english, 11th century english.

    This slightly more recent Middle English of the 14th century is almost recognizable as a biblical verse:

    And it is don, aftirward Jesus made iourne bi cites & castelis prechende & euangelisende e rewme of god, & twelue wi hym & summe wymmen at weren helid of wicke spiritis & sicnesses, marie at is clepid maudeleyn, of whom seuene deuelis wenten out & Jone e wif off chusi procuratour of eroude, & susanne & manye oere at mynystreden to hym of her facultes

    But I seriously doubt anyone would try to pull that off.

    The idea that you could go back in time over 500 years and not be completely incomprehensible simply by changing the emphasis on your words and not mentioning modern plumbing is absurd.

    It is a game, just type in regular modern english.

    post count +1
    - Lord Taldier


    A casual stroll through the lunatic asylum shows that faith does not prove anything.
    - Nietzsche

  13. #13
    Telaran Sykriar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Washington
    Posts
    52

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Taldier View Post
    Atleast steal the work of someone who knows what they are talking about. It isnt old english, its Elizabethan english, or more correctly "Early Modern English" (and a fairly poor guide to early modern english at that). This was the form of the english language used in the works of Shakespeare in the 16th century.

    Old English is what the original Beowulf was written in, I've yet to see anyone attempt to roleplay like this in a game:

    Hwt! wē Gār-Dena in ġeār-dagum, ēod-cyninga, rym ġefrūnon, hū ā elingas ellen fremedon. Oft Scyld Scēfing sceaena rēatum, monegum mǣġum, meodosetla oftēah, egsode eorlas. Syan ǣrest wear fēasceaft funden, hē s frōfre ġebād, wēox under wolcnum, weormyndum āh, ot him ǣġhwylc āra ymbsittendra ofer hronrāde hȳran scolde, gomban gyldan. t ws gōd cyning!

    Yes, that is english, 11th century english.

    This slightly more recent Middle English of the 14th century is almost recognizable as a biblical verse:

    And it is don, aftirward Jesus made iourne bi cites & castelis prechende & euangelisende e rewme of god, & twelue wi hym & summe wymmen at weren helid of wicke spiritis & sicnesses, marie at is clepid maudeleyn, of whom seuene deuelis wenten out & Jone e wif off chusi procuratour of eroude, & susanne & manye oere at mynystreden to hym of her facultes

    But I seriously doubt anyone would try to pull that off.

    The idea that you could go back in time over 500 years and not be completely incomprehensible simply by changing the emphasis on your words and not mentioning modern plumbing is absurd.

    It is a game, just type in regular modern english.

    post count +1
    Would you like to relax and have a cup of tea with me and speak of ye olde engrish?

  14. #14
    Plane Touched MasaGet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Madrid
    Posts
    188

    Default

    Got to love this forums with iAmDeathSpank and Elux around here...
    "Speaking the Truth in times of universal deceit is a revolutionary act."

    - George Orwell

  15. #15
    Plane Walker Grymmoire's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Columbus, OH
    Posts
    400

    Default

    Perhaps the best way for some players is to emulate the speech of a mute!
    "You're simply jealous since the voices speak only to me."

Closed Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts