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Thread: Building First PC

  1. #1
    Rift Chaser Carnalpleasure's Avatar
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    Default Building First PC

    So I am putting together a list of part's to build my first custom PC, and I am wondering how the list look's to those who know a lot about this kind of stuff.

    CASE - $125 - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16811133194
    Motherboard - $95 - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16813131835
    Processor - $90 - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16819106001
    Harddrive - $90 - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16820227714
    GPU - $280 - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16814121656
    Memory - $53 - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16820233144
    Power Supply - $140 - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16817151087
    CD/DVD Burner - $20 - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16827135204


    If I am missing something and/or something isn't compatible please let me know. Like I said, this will be my first attempt at building a PC.

    [4/4 ToDQ[*]3/4 FT[*]2/5 EE]

  2. #2
    Rift Disciple Cognus's Avatar
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    Don't hurt yourself friend!

    Recovering Rogue, gone Cleric (to summate, a masochist)

  3. #3
    Champion Taxt's Avatar
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    Thought this was a forum for a game called Rfit ?

  4. #4
    Ascendant Crithappens's Avatar
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    As is, this system will NOT work.

    AMD motherboards do not work with Intel CPUs, and vice-versa. Also, make sure that the socket type on your motherboard matches that of your CPU.

    Also remember to buy some thermal paste or a thermal pad for setting your CPU into your motherboard. Trying to use a CPU without these is dangerous!

    I'd also suggest a water-cooling system for your CPU so you can overclock it. The extra money spent on it will be less than the extra money for buying a more powerful CPU.
    Rahka@Wolfsbane

  5. #5
    Ascendant
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    Yep, you have a mismatch with the MB and CPU. As to the rest of the kit, I can't say, I'm out of the loop and refuse to look at any gear until I know if there is a bonus in my future. Should know mon or tues....

    My advise is that you spend a couple weeks researching. Do google searches on "best GPU", "recommend gaming motherboard", etc... . Do this for each component until you gain enough knowledge.

    Your CPU/MB mismatch tells me you should not be attempting this at this point in time. Not saying your not capable, just not ready.

  6. #6
    Ascendant Laeris's Avatar
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    If you've never built a PC before... at least go to newegg and get one of the DIY bundles. Those are already part matched for compatibility. Mobo/CPU are matched with proper RAM in most of them. They have all kinds of bundles from mobo/cpu combos to complete systems.

    Lastly, make sure you research how to configure your BIOS properly and read every single word of the MOBO user manual on how and where to connect everything.

    Also, as the above poster said... you might not be ready. Putting a PC together isn't much different than rebuilding a car engine. It isn't all that difficult but you can really screw it up if you don't know what you're doing. If you don't have very good hardware knowledge, you'll more than likely end up having to pay someone to build it or fix it for you... then you're looking at it probably costing you less money to just buy one from somewhere in the first place.
    Last edited by Laeris; 02-08-2013 at 12:20 AM.

  7. #7
    Rift Master Salamol's Avatar
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    Check out review sites, as others have said. I find Tom's Hardware pretty good:

    http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/gaming...iew-32611.html
    http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/gaming...iew-32612.html

    You might be best asking this stuff on other forums that have more collective knowledge/experience. I did 3 upgrades to my PC last year... they all had slight compatability problems (My GPU was too big so I had to take a hacksaw to my case, my new MOBO had no PATA slot so I couldn't connect my DVD drives to install windows (fixed by borrowing a USB DVD drive from a neighbour) and I didn't have a spare SATA power cable for my new SSD (to be fair, I did, but it was hiding at the bottom of a moving box that I found weeks after buying a new cable).

    Expect the unexpected! Good luck and don't rush into it!

  8. #8
    RIFT Guide Writer Redcruxs's Avatar
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    For best results with rift, go with an intel mobo, intel CPU, and an Nvidia graphics card. AMD/ATI is asking for trouble (build several machines that are nearly unusable in games from bugs/crashes/glitches due to those brands)

  9. #9
    Telaran
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    As most of the other guys/girls here have said, make sure all of your components match. And make a budget while considering what type of pc you want:
    - I want a gamer pc that can max out every game with 50+ fps
    - I want to do a lot of video rendering and music editing
    - I want to record and/ or stream live while playing games.
    - I want a pc that doesnt get outdated in 3-5 years.

    There sure is more, but you got the basics here.

    Secondly when you know what type of pc you want. Then move on to make the budget, I would highly recommend paying some extra/ be really carefull while choosing for these components (I did that mistake before):
    - the motherboard - lets say in a few years you decide that you want to a better cpu, another gfx card (maybe 2 for sli/crossfire), upgrade ram or maybe get some more hdds for more space or any raid config. Then the motherboard will have to be capable of doing so, and by getting low-end motherboard you're stuck.
    - The powersupply. I don't know how many I've known that have bought that gamer pc with gtx 670s, multiple hdds, x amounts of fans and whatever with a 650w psu. First of all, your psu is going to run hot, which will cause it to be loud, secondly a psu under hard pressure will reduce its capabilty to give those watts all the time over longer periods of stressfull powerdemanding stuff. It will loose some of its wattage over time, and sooner or later its gonna get broken. As well as getting a psu with higher wattage than needed is always good because it leaves room for later upgrades.

    Another thing to keep in mind is to make sure you are not causing a bottleneck, but if you read reviews of diffrent components and ask if these and these match together is another good idea.

    The last thing I want to mention is about building the pc all on your own. What do we say, there is always a first time? All I can say that if you have build sucessfull legos, then building a pc will not be that hard. I would recommend watching a video of someone doing it properly. So therefor check out this video:
    its linus tech tips showing you how to build a gaming pc.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=84NvDMMrCNU

    Good luck!

  10. #10
    Ascendant Laeris's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dryell View Post
    As most of the other guys/girls here have said, make sure all of your components match. And make a budget while considering what type of pc you want:
    - I want a gamer pc that can max out every game with 50+ fps
    - I want to do a lot of video rendering and music editing
    - I want to record and/ or stream live while playing games.
    - I want a pc that doesnt get outdated in 3-5 years.

    There sure is more, but you got the basics here.

    Secondly when you know what type of pc you want. Then move on to make the budget, I would highly recommend paying some extra/ be really carefull while choosing for these components (I did that mistake before):
    - the motherboard - lets say in a few years you decide that you want to a better cpu, another gfx card (maybe 2 for sli/crossfire), upgrade ram or maybe get some more hdds for more space or any raid config. Then the motherboard will have to be capable of doing so, and by getting low-end motherboard you're stuck.
    - The powersupply. I don't know how many I've known that have bought that gamer pc with gtx 670s, multiple hdds, x amounts of fans and whatever with a 650w psu. First of all, your psu is going to run hot, which will cause it to be loud, secondly a psu under hard pressure will reduce its capabilty to give those watts all the time over longer periods of stressfull powerdemanding stuff. It will loose some of its wattage over time, and sooner or later its gonna get broken. As well as getting a psu with higher wattage than needed is always good because it leaves room for later upgrades.

    Another thing to keep in mind is to make sure you are not causing a bottleneck, but if you read reviews of diffrent components and ask if these and these match together is another good idea.

    The last thing I want to mention is about building the pc all on your own. What do we say, there is always a first time? All I can say that if you have build sucessfull legos, then building a pc will not be that hard. I would recommend watching a video of someone doing it properly. So therefor check out this video:
    its linus tech tips showing you how to build a gaming pc.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=84NvDMMrCNU

    Good luck!
    The physical process of putting a PC together is easy. It's no different than putting square pegs in square holes really. The problem new PC builders will face is BIOS setup, BIOS updating, BIOS configuration, jumper settings, hard drive configuration,1st-time driver and firmware loads and other things like getting all the fans to work at the proper limits.

  11. #11
    Rift Master Salamol's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Laeris View Post
    The physical process of putting a PC together is easy. It's no different than putting square pegs in square holes really. The problem new PC builders will face is BIOS setup, BIOS updating, BIOS configuration, jumper settings, hard drive configuration,1st-time driver and firmware loads and other things like getting all the fans to work at the proper limits.
    I find the fear of breaking something during installation far more daunting than fiddling with the BIOS (which, with the newer MOBOs is much more straightforward looking than it used to be!). The software stuff takes much longer, but knowing that it turns on and everything is connected is the biggest weight off of my mind.

    I've only last year built my own PC for the first time... but I've been fixing problems with my older ones, installing drivers, changing BIOS options and reloading windows since the 90s. I imagine once I've done it a few times though, I'll find the building part easiest.

  12. #12
    Telaran
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    Quote Originally Posted by Laeris View Post
    The physical process of putting a PC together is easy. It's no different than putting square pegs in square holes really. The problem new PC builders will face is BIOS setup, BIOS updating, BIOS configuration, jumper settings, hard drive configuration,1st-time driver and firmware loads and other things like getting all the fans to work at the proper limits.
    To be honest, I dont believe that is any problem either. Bios setup and such is pretty straight forward. Especially with newer motherboards. Flashing bios can be done with a usb drive and by just pressing the button on the board. (I know asuses boards have this). Booting setup is also straight forward, you want to set the hdds and maybe optical drive to whatever booting order you want. Following the instructions on the screen is okay.

    But if you have no clue what so ever about following instructions on the monitor or care to read some guides I guess you're stuck. Not saying it is easy or not, just that things aint that hard if you put some effort into reading guides, trying and so on. Thats the way you learn! (:

  13. #13
    Ascendant Laeris's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dryell View Post
    But if you have no clue what so ever about following instructions on the monitor or care to read some guides I guess you're stuck. Not saying it is easy or not, just that things aint that hard if you put some effort into reading guides, trying and so on. Thats the way you learn! (:
    I just remember the first PC I build. It was a x486 intel PC. It never really worked right and I messed up the install and partitioned my hard drive with 12 partitions and it took me 2 weeks to figure out why I couldn't load my operating system. I was only 14 at the time and I had made so many small partitions that the OS had no room on any one partition.

    I agree though, flashing a BIOS is easy. Setting it up is easy. However each and every custom built PC is different. Having a PC that runs well and one that merely runs is the difference between someone who knows how to manage their settings and someone who just puts things in the right holes.

  14. #14
    Rift Chaser Ronaldspiers's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Taxt View Post
    Thought this was a forum for a game called Rfit ?
    Yeah but off topic section is for this kind of jazz :P

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