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Thread: My son has Celiacs, and a couple allergies

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    Ascendant Fireforge's Avatar
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    Default My son has Celiacs, and a couple allergies

    Hey everyone. My son was diagnosed with Celiacs disease today. We have also learned that he is highly allergic to garlic, lactose, and the walnut family. His diet for the next 3 months from the doctor is going to be fresh meats, fruits, and vegetables. I was wondering if anyone had some good resources online for Celiacs or for food allergies.

    Any help would be appreciated, thanks.

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    Prophet of Telara FoxMaiden's Avatar
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    Keep him away from holy objects, dont douse him with holy water, and keep all knotted up materials away from him. :P

    Also check out WebMD or something like that... Google is your friend.

    Sorry to hear about your son btw.
    :: Ceileigh Amberlight - Dwarf Engineer :: Nimhue Amberlight - Dwarf Druid :: Faeblight ::


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    Ascendant Fireforge's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FoxMaiden View Post
    Keep him away from holy objects, dont douse him with holy water, and keep all knotted up materials away from him. :P

    Also check out WebMD or something like that... Google is your friend.

    Sorry to hear about your son btw.
    Yep, I am doing the Google thing for sure - I found this one

    http://www.gfoverflow.com/

    Seems pretty good. Type in gelatin for instance and it reports what products within that category are gluten free.

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    Rift Disciple
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    What state do you live in? In CA you can get locally farmed produce from nearby farms; not sure where/if they have that where you are.

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    Ascendant Fireforge's Avatar
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    Michigan. I'll have to look into that.

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    Rich Aemry
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    I have celiacs, and it sucks. The thing that still makes it the hardest is that everyone else I know including my parents and fiancιe never did the diet with me. You will spare you son much heartache if your whole family does it with him.

    Also you will need to have a maid service come in to get every single kitchen surface you can and can't see cleaned. Even having gluten in the house will cause him long term trouble, so be ANAL-RETENTIVE about it. I'm looking at a transplant b/c of lack of adequate treatment as a child, and I'm still not quite 30.

    That said the diet sucks at first, but after about 3 months you'll get sick from the smell of the bakery and other gluten-tastic foods. I don't mind it at all anymore, but the GF bread doesn't taste like regular bread so wait a couple months and don't eat bread at all so you don't compare the two IMO.

    If you treat him young he'll be just fine, keep up with the restaurants in your town who are gluten free. Subway is in theory. They even have a GF roll, and the GF brownies are AMAZING!!!!!! In practice though it's hard to tell. He's young so it's not as bad as when he's older, so if you hound them to be careful (every subway employee was trained in proper procedure BTW) he should be okay. Outback also has good GF food, though they are pricey.

    Brands matter in GF/CF, the goods one rarly screw up, and the bad ones are liars. I recommend Pamela s, they make every mix you can imagine, and they are all good. They are also very careful. Glutino is also good. Bob's Redmill is known to have contamination and then lie about it. You'll need to learn to bake to some extent, but Kroger, and even Walmart now have decent selection. It's not as bad now as it was even 5-10 years ago. Things are looking up!!!!

    This website saved my life!!!!!!!!!!! http://glutenfreegirl.com/ Great uplifting stores and good recipes.

    If you need additional advice PM me.

    Edit: Beer is also really bad to keep in the house. Make people drink something else like cider. Beer gets gluten on everything.

    Edit #2: It's not really that bad. You will all feel better, lose weight, and be much more healthy. It's going to make your whole family's lives better.
    Last edited by Rich Aemry; 05-23-2011 at 11:45 PM.

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    Ascendant Fireforge's Avatar
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    Thank you Rich! The cleaning was something not mentioned to us. It makes perfect sense. Also, thanks for the link - those are the kinds of resources I was looking for.

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    Plane Touched Avyn's Avatar
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    A friend of mine has Celiacs and he had this lecture about it where he told us it really made it easier cause his mom and dad did the diet with him.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Avyn View Post
    A friend of mine has Celiacs and he had this lecture about it where he told us it really made it easier cause his mom and dad did the diet with him.
    My wife and I have agreed to eat the diet with him. I think that is really good advice.

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    Rich Aemry
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    http://www.celiac.com/ pretty good website.

    http://www.pamelasproducts.com/ These guys make amazing biscuits, pancakes, cookies (best GF cookies period IMO,) cakes, and everything else under the sun. I've never had a bad product from these people, and they are known to be uncontaminated.

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    Ascendant Fireforge's Avatar
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    Those are bookmarked now as well. It's going to be a pretty customized diet because of the allergies that he has.

    The walnut allergy cuts out
    • Almonds
    • Hazelnuts
    • Brazil nut
    • Cashew
    • Pecan nut
    • Pistachios
    • Macadamia nuts
    • Sesame seeds
    • Mustard

    The lactose allergy cuts out a lot of foods as well

    http://www.cpmc.org/advanced/pediatr...ctosefree.html

    Then he is highly allergic to garlic, so that cuts out a bunch of foods that are seasoned. I am finding garlic to be a lot more common than I thought.

    All of these restrictions plus the gluten is going to make for a bunch of fresh, unprocessed foods for a few months. The doctor has requested a very simple diet to help reset his system.

    I am glad we found someone who knew what to do. He was none to thrilled with having 33 draws of blood in one sitting, but after hearing about what happened to you in an untreated environment, and the lasting effects of such, it is a relief to know that he is still fairly young.

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    Sword of Telara Palvy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fireforge View Post
    Hey everyone. My son was diagnosed with Celiacs disease today. We have also learned that he is highly allergic to garlic, lactose, and the walnut family. His diet for the next 3 months from the doctor is going to be fresh meats, fruits, and vegetables. I was wondering if anyone had some good resources online for Celiacs or for food allergies.

    Any help would be appreciated, thanks.
    I'm not sure about resources, but with food allergies, you must be careful to read the ingredients of everything. I will not go to a restaurant unless I can check out the menu beforehand and make sure they have safe selections. At potlucks, I ask people what the ingredients of the dishes they bring are. Before going to someone's house, I tell them what foods to avoid. Sometimes, biting an allergenic food causes my mouth to prickle--but not all foods warn me like that.

    For some people, smelling the odor of a food they are allergic to can cause a reaction.

    Picking the offending food out of a dish otherwise made with safe foods doesn't work.

    Allergic reactions do not seem to be consistent. I've had reactions ranging from nausea, to being violently ill, weak, and shaky. Some people react very violently to certain foods; I believe tree nut allergies are very prone to causing severe life-threatening reactions.

    People sometimes overreact; I sent a dish back at a restaurant once, and they were worried that they should be calling an ambulance.

    Your son will have to adapt his lifestyle to avoid his allergies. It can be hard, especially if he has always loved a particular food he can't eat any more.

  13. #13
    Rich Aemry
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fireforge View Post
    Those are bookmarked now as well. It's going to be a pretty customized diet because of the allergies that he has.

    The walnut allergy cuts out
    • Almonds
    • Hazelnuts
    • Brazil nut
    • Cashew
    • Pecan nut
    • Pistachios
    • Macadamia nuts
    • Sesame seeds
    • Mustard

    The lactose allergy cuts out a lot of foods as well

    http://www.cpmc.org/advanced/pediatr...ctosefree.html

    Then he is highly allergic to garlic, so that cuts out a bunch of foods that are seasoned. I am finding garlic to be a lot more common than I thought.

    All of these restrictions plus the gluten is going to make for a bunch of fresh, unprocessed foods for a few months. The doctor has requested a very simple diet to help reset his system.

    I am glad we found someone who knew what to do. He was none to thrilled with having 33 draws of blood in one sitting, but after hearing about what happened to you in an untreated environment, and the lasting effects of such, it is a relief to know that he is still fairly young.
    It's not that uncommon. I can't eat preservatives at all in addition to having celiacs That makes things pretty rough. It's probably not lactose BTW celiacs is an intolerance to Gluten (grain proteins) and Caisin (milk protein.) Many doctors tell you lactose since its easier to understand.

    You'll get really good at reading labels LOL which will make you lose weight since you're reading the label anyways and will see how many calories are in everything. Modern American corn now contains gluten BTW since the genetic engineering has altered it. Corn is still listed as GF even though it isn't b/c the corn lobby is so damn wealthy and powerful (with farming subsidies your taxes paid for too.) if you buy an heirloom corn its still gluten free, but I don't buy "GF" labeled products with corn for myself. Hate to make that even harder, corn is in everything.

    I personally drink Almond milk, but Rice Milk is damn tasty too. Soy milk is pretty gross to me personally. Coconut milk is great for breakfast cereal, and makes the best ice cream you'll ever have. It's better than I remember blue bell being.
    Last edited by Rich Aemry; 05-24-2011 at 06:49 PM.

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    Ascendant Fireforge's Avatar
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    Thanks again Rich and thank you Palvy. Every bit of info helps me until we can get into the nutritionist. The more I read, the more this seems like a Chinese puzzle. I am sure it will get easier once I know a little more.

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    RIFT Guide Writer Akhet's Avatar
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    One of my friends was diagnosed with Celiacs soon after birth, so she has lived with it all her life. It's commendable that you and your wife are committing to the same diet your son will be on. I'm sure it means a lot to him that his family is willing to go through the experience with him and support him through learning and experiencing together.

    I found a page with several organizations' phone numbers and contact information. Maybe you can find a support group in your area. I bet your son would be excited to find people his age going through the same thing! Here it is: http://digestive.niddk.nih.gov/ddiseases/pubs/celiac/

    If he is young, there is one thing I can suggest that my friend's parents used to do for us. When she would spend a considerable amount of time with us, either on a trip or a sleepover or what have you, they would give us a sheet of paper with her doctor's name and phone number, good and bad foods and their emergency contact information should anything go wrong while she was staying with us. Her mother also took the time to sit down with us and her to tell us about Celiac's and what we could do to help her daughter feel safe while she stayed with us.

    Some people won't understand, and at worst won't be willing to listen or help you. For every one of those people, though, there is a plethora of others that would enjoy learning about Celiac's and how they can help. Patience and sharing your knowledge with your son's friends and their families will go a long way and can ensure a safer environment for him.

    Learning together will hopefully give him the confidence to be able to cope in real-world situations where you may not be there. It seems silly, but a couple of people I know with food allergies are still scared to ask for something else or for their meal to be prepared in a special way. They don't want to be seen as high-maintenance and I tell them its not worth getting sick over, just order your damn food the way you want it. Haha.

    Good luck!

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