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Thread: A Comprehensive Look at Gameplay, Meters, AddOns & more (plus free history lessons)

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    Default A Comprehensive Look at Gameplay, Meters, AddOns & more (plus free history lessons)

    [Disclaimer: I reserve the right to fix these original posts at any time if I discover that something is not clear or that there are mistakes.]

    Introduction

    This is a long look at a topic which has been getting a great deal of attention on the Rift forums. It's been written for both my "From the Bridge" blog on Peripity.com as well as the official Rift forums, where I've split it off as a new topic. (This will go up on Rift's forums then my personal blog afterwards. You can comment there if you'd like as well. Links are in my signature.)

    My attempt to show a number of viewpoints here is genuine. If you feel that I have done your particular viewpoint a disservice, I apologize. I am one person writing from my years of experience, and from knowing the people I have gamed with and interacted with. I have done my best, but with an issue as complex as this one, there are bound to be mistakes. If there's an obvious misunderstanding in your eyes, I'm willing to accept the blame for not comprehending the points which were being made by others. In addition, please remember that I am doing my best to represent player and devloper interests alike in this post. It's a tough balance.

    Topics of this Article

    Covered in this text are the major topics of Gameplay (which is to so, how the game is going to be upon release, as a result of varying factors), Meters (in specific in game UI-elements designed to display metagame information), and AddOns (pieces of functional code written by amateur fans of the game for inclusion by interested parties) as well as a few other players.

    These others are 3rd Party Programs (programs run outside of the game interface developed by amateur fans of the game for use by interested parties), Skins (UI elements with no functionality changes, only cosmetic ones), and a couple even more minor things not defined here.

    The reason each of these items has been included is because of the tie-ins to the others. Meters and Parsers (a type of 3rd party program) have many similarities. AddOns potentially include both Skins and Meters. It's not wise to break things up into too many pieces as you tend to lose the big picture. For this reason I've chosen a specific scope for this article.

    A Few Words on Length

    This work exceeds easy reading length (~1000 words) by far. The issues involved here are very complicated, and cannot be easily condensed. I apologize for this fact in advance, and encourage you to nonetheless read the entire article (and preferably the other comments) before responding. Not everything can be said briefly, and sometimes investing time in a subject can bring you to new thoughts on the matter at hand.
    Last edited by Corwynn_Maelstrom; 12-10-2010 at 12:35 PM.
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    Part One: Historical Perspective

    The timeline of MMO gaming extends back in graphical terms to the mid to late 1990's when two major games released. These were Ultima Online, an isometric online version of Origins' Ultima universe, and EverQuest, a first-person (primarily anyway) online fantasy game in a new world from Verant/989 Studios. These two games are generally considered the forefathers of the modern MMO.

    Prior to these graphical MMOs, there were other games which lent their own DNA to these new creations. The MUD (multi-user dungeon) experience had been going since the late 1970's, and has spawned thousands of games between that time and the release of the first major graphical MMOs. Of specific note were the DIKU MUDs (a 1990 codebase from the University of Copenhagen) which inspired Brad McQuaid to create what was a game very nearly identical to the DIKU base in EverQuest, and led to LegendMUD's development by Raph Koster previous to his involvement in Ultima Online.

    Since these two iconic games were released (note that both of them continue operation to this day) the MMO genre has seen multiple iterations of new generations of games hit the scene. The original generation of games directly derived from MUD roots also included Turbine's Asheron's Call, and (though technically a second generation game, it came directly from a design team with strong MUD roots) Mythic's Dark Age of Camelot. Also of note in this generation were the more minor (but still very historicly important) games released just prior to Ultima Online: The Realm Online, Nexus: Kingdom of the Winds (which led to Lineage, the first "2nd generation" game, actually released before the last of the first generation hit), and Meridian 59. Collectively players who were involved in these games are often referred to as "old school" MMO gamers, though the term is problematic as these games were more wildly different in features than those of following generations.

    The second generation of MMOs were all influenced by the first generation more than MUDs (with the potential exception of Dark Age of Camelot), and were all released in the years between 2001 to 2003. Major games of this time incuded Funcom's Anarchy Online, Jagex's RuneScape, Gravity Corp's Ragnarok Online, Square's Final Fantasy XI (a direct result of Tanaka's reaction to seeing EverQuest), Wolfpack Studios' Shadowbane, SOE's EverQuest Online Adventures, SOE's Star Wars Galaxies, CCP's EVE Online, NCSoft's Lineage II, Linden Labs' Second Life, Artifact Entertainment's Horizons: Empire of Istaria, and Cryptic Studio's City of Heroes.

    The third generation of games has drawn heavily on things learned from first and second generation titles. The first two (and in some ways the most important two) titles of the third generation were SOE's EverQuest II and Blizzard's World of Warcraft. You'd almost nead to not be breathing to have missed in specific World of Warcraft's importance, but EverQuest II was obviously of the same new generation, and served to usher in the era as well. Other games from this third generation include Turbine's Dungeons and Dragons Online, ArenaNet's GuildWars, Joymax's Silkroad Online, Webzen's Soul of the Ultimate Nation, and CCR's RF Online. Note that a number of these games are following a free-to-play (pay for specific things) or buy-to-play (one time fee) model, which is something which did not widely exist prior to the third generation. Note that roughly 2004-2007/08 is when games of this generation were released.

    The "Next" generation of games has been upon us for a couple of years now. Until we get deeper into it, there will be difficulty in discerning where precisely things started, but it looks like 2007 or 2008 was when it began. It is possible that no strict timeline is really applicable given the development cycles of various games and where the teams gained their influences from. These games drew heavily from seeing third generation games such as World of Warcraft in action, giving many of them the misnomer of "WoW-clones" despite many development cycles pre-dating the release of Blizzard's popular MMO. Notable "next" generation games would include Sigil's Vanguard: Saga of Heroes, Turbine's Lord of the Rings Online, Mythic's Warhammer Online: Age of Reckoning, NCSoft's AION, SOE's Free Realms, Runewaker Entertainment's Runes of Magic, and Astrum Nival's Allods Online.

    The "even-Nexterer" generation may be upon us. With the games currently in development we are seeing a trend of distilling the triumphs (all too few) and failures (all too many) of games belonging to the so-called "Next" generation. It is possible that the games being ushered in in 2011 and for the few years beyond will actually belong to a generation we're not even fully aware of existing yet. Titles in development which may be a part of this as-yet-unhatched group (or even a future one we can't concieve of yet) include Trion World's Rift, Bioware's Star Wars: The Old Republic, Jagex's Stellar Dawn, Bluehole Studio's TERA Online, ArenaNet's GuildWars 2, CCP's World of Darkness, and 38 Studios' still-codenamed Copernicus.

    Why is this important? Because without a basic concept of where the games came from and how they have developed, it becomes impossible to view development decisions with any kind of perspective. In specific the game under discussion at the time I originally wrote this is Rift, potentially a member of an as-yet-unknown generation of games which have not only seen the successes of the third generation of games, but the trials of the fourth. Much of what I'm going to lay out is related to all MMOs, however, so this article may very well be of interest to parties not concerned with that specific title.
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    Part Two: The Evolution of Gameplay

    With a (somewhat) long and varied history, MMOs have demonstrated a wide gamut of gameplay options over the past decade plus. While the genre of game is younger than most, there have been sufficiently diverse titles pup out to demonstrate that one MMO is not necessarily like another. As a result, as generations have advanced, more and more refinements have been made to the new offerings. Features from older games have been incorporated into newer games. One of the most influential games to date is the third generation title World of Warcraft. This has been so widely used as a basis for the incorporation of features that many games have begun to be classed as "WoW-clones" simply due to the nature of the look-and-feel of the games. What makes this particularly interesting is the fact that as a third generation game, World of Warcraft was heavily influenced by first and second generation titles, and the IP used in the game was originally adapted from Games Workshops' Warhammer Fantasy universe. World of Warcraft is in and of itself no more than a collection of what has come before it, making the "WoW-clone" term an uninspired misnomer.

    In the first generation of titles the four most important titles were EverQuest, Ultima Online, Dark Age of Camelot (again, 1st generation by pedigree, not timeline), and Asheron's Call. Each one of these games offered a very different type of play. Each of them has contributed something to games which have been developed since. It is difficult to judge which titles have contributed precisely which elements and to what other games, but it is for example generally accepted that the majority of later games have been more heavily infuenced by EverQuest and Dark Age of Camelot than by Ultima Online and Asheron's Call. The former two tended towards condensed areas (though not nearly as condensed as many of the "zones" of modern games) and level-based hotbar-oriented combat, whereas the latter were more open in terms of space and had skill-based advancement. This fundamental difference has been referred to as "Theme-Park" vs. "Sandbox" game design, though it is very wise to reiterate that the original zone-based class-and-level-oriented games were vastly different (in scope certainly) from the more modern games following this model.

    Games in the second generation took much of what was learned from the first generation and enhanced it. Anarchy Online is an interesting example of what happened with the hybridization of theme-park and sandbox gameplay, as it took elements of both and added in a key feature which changed the MMO genre: instancing. This technique would prove to be a driving feature for most games of the third and later generations, to the extent that some games are now nearly wholly instanced, such as GuildWars. In addition to major functionality, these games tended to enhance the user experience a great deal, offering more in the way of interface options. As an example, EVE Online's interface was highly modular at release, and has since continued to be refined.

    The third generation of games took stock of the successes of (in particular) games like EverQuest and Final Fantasy XI, and with design teams experienced in the genre, produced what are arguably some of the more successful games on a number of fronts. Certainly World of Warcraft is a vast success, but other titles have had good, profitable runs such as GuildWars and EverQuest II. The major legacy the third generation has provided for future games is an array of convenience features and casual elements. This generation was the first to really focus on giving players a lot more of what they desired, and less of what the designers thought was good for them. In some cases this has been detrimental to the difficulty of the games of this and later generation games. In addition, user-created utilities became very prevalent, particularly with World of Warcraft's AddOn system. This allowed users to begin to add functionality to games without the consent of the developers.

    In the fourth generation there were a number of high profile failures to achieve success. The "bar" set by World of Warcraft seemed to be a target for too many development companies. As a result unrealistic hype and expectations resulted in some major issues with released titles. Games like Vanguard, Age of Conan, and Warhammer Online each had major chances to break onto the scene having learned a great deal from three previous generations of games, yet each one had fundamental issues and failed to deliver success as anticipated. Notably these games offered a variety of gameplay which spanned the previous generations nicely, taking features from past games and revising them for the new generation. The general results for the fourth generation of games as been disappointing, but with games like AION and Runes of Magic there have been some measure of success to come out of the pool.

    The games coming up as part of the fifth generation of MMOs are promising great things. With enough perspective on the fantasic success of the third generation, and the fourth's general inability to deliver, the market seems ready to have at least some of these new games come in and be notable success stories. All that remains to be seen is if these titles can learn from some of the mistakes made during the fourth generation's attempts to incorporate the third and earlier generations' gameplay features.
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    Part Three: Development Pedigrees

    Each new game coming out within the fifth "Nexterest" generation of MMOs has a specific pedigree. The roots of the features can be traced back, and the developers working on the titles are in many cases veterans of multiple shipped titles. While the exact details of where features came from may be unknown even to the most "in-the-know" on each individual team, some clear lines can be drawn. The development of Star Wars: The Old Republic will tie deeply into the story-based gameplay common to Bioware's Mass Effect and Dragon Age titles. TERA and GuildWars 2 have a great deal of heritage tied up in earlier NCSoft games. In particular Lineage II (and to some extent the unreleased III) and GuildWars respectively.

    When considering how to develop a game the design team needs to have a "high concept" which is really just a way of expressing what a game is. Similar to the way a Hollywood script-writer might pitch their latest work as "a wagon-train to the stars" (bonus points for anyone who knows what that was), MMO design teams will select a quick and easy way of describing their game to each other and to outsiders. These "high concepts" are what drive game development and fundamentally shape the product which will eventually be released. As a result, fans of the genre will at times be following games which are actually not aimed at their needs. A good example of this is the persistent forum thread which arises on the official boards of every new game detailing why a free-for-all player versus player ruleset is a good idea to have. It is irrelevant to the player posting the thread that the design team already has the concepts of the game laid out, they simply want to make the case for their brand of gameplay.

    The wisest course of action for players awaiting an upcoming game is to determine in which areas the design of the title might potentially be flexible, and concentrate on those areas when providing suggestions. This of course requires an actual investment of time an energy, and is zometimes hindered by the lack of concrete information being provided by the developers. At time of writing, it is not possible to determine how much of an influence open world PvP will have on gameplay in Rift. There is enough nebulousness to provide some hope for players who enjoy open field combat, and yet it is entirely possible that the influence of this specific aspect of gameplay has already been set at a specific level by the developers.

    When checking the forums (and feedback forms, etc.) for ideas, developers will often shelve any idea which lies too far outside the scope of the master plan for the game. The more wild the idea, the further away the shelve upon which that idea is placed. So only ideas which closely mesh with a game's design pedigree will generally make it into consideration prior to (or shortly thereafter) release. There are exceptions made for extremely good ideas, and particularly simple and uncontroversial ones.

    The bigger hot-button issues are generally left until after a game's intial release so that the development team can see how the playerbase reacts to the game. Post-release there are usually issues which are no longer brought up as players who champion them either see that they are not necessary, or abandon play of the title. That said, it remains important for players to represent their ideas, thus allowing the development team to see which issues remain on players' minds. MMOs are long-term commitments, and release is just the beginning of a game's life cycle.

    The first time a game should shift and adapt new features which may fall outside of the original pedigree are after release and the initial fixes which come with it. At this time it's a good idea for players to champion their ideas taking into account the way the game actually plays. Developers usually remain exceptionally keen to see player feedback at this point in time, as it provides an indication of how successful they have been in the creation of the game they intended. At times it becomes apparent that the game is not playing as intended, and the developers will take into account player feedback in making changes. This may be more or less successful, but players have a key role in the process, and one which should be executed responsibly.

    If a game is clearly not someone's "cup of tea" as it were, they should avoid trying to champion changes to the design, and instead move on to another game. If there are fundamental issues with the game for a player, it's unlikely that the changes required would benefit even that specific player enough, and it would most assuredly cause more consternation for other players were such changes to be incorporated. On the other extreme, if a player loves a game completely, they should not allow that love to cause them to resist change of any type. An open mind when reading the feedback of others can allow a player who is indeed quite happy with the game to see small issues they might prefer to see corrected, or gain a greater understanding of the views of their fellows.

    A better understanding of a game's specific pedigree can help players to make better decisions regarding playing or sticking with a specific title. While much of this can be done though research, it is also the responsibility of the marketing department of the development team to be honest and open regarding what a game is intended to be. There's a fine line between balancing hype and outright misleading the public. Some companies (notably in the fourth generation) strated too far into the latter in pursuit of the former. Future mistakes like this are
    better avoided as they only risk loss of potential return on investment.
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    Part Four: Players as Developers

    During the second and third generations of MMOs something fundamental changed in some of the titles. There was a shift in the ability of the players to effect the games they played. While Saga of Ryzom (a third generation game launched right before EverQuest II and World of Warcraft) offered a huge toolkit for player-generated content, and the late second generation "game" Second Life both echoed with MOO (a specific type of MUD) features allowing players to create their own content, the biggest wave-maker was World of Warcraft's extensive interface API using LUA scripting.

    As a result of how the API for the game worked, player-developers soon fundamentally changed the gameplay of World of Warcraft, adding in abilities not present in the original client, making it possible to do things in new ways. Some of the AddOns were considered so fundamentally game-changing that Blizzard developers were forced to patch changes to the interface API in order to neuter their effectiveness. As it stands today, AddOns in World of Warcraft and other games with similar APIs are a requirement for any player wishing to operate at the peak of efficiency. These games' default interfaces are not capable of offering the kind of speed and information needed to play as well as one which has been modified with player-created helpers of various kinds.

    In essence the allowance of player-created content (in specific functional UI modifications) into games has created a kind of "arms race" in which the best of the best compete at a high level because of the extras they have brought to the table. Instead of relying on a level playing field, these games are forcing players to try and get the best "gear" for their game client possible. Many guilds have lists of "required" and "recommended" AddOns for World of Warcraft, to be enabled by each raid member during play. As new AddOns come out, these lists are modified, ensuring that the guild members maintain the current "best in slot" AddOns for the task. On the PvP front these AddOns are similarly useful, providing ease of targeting, information exchange, etc. Once AddOns are enabled for a game, there is a neverending race to see who can develop the best solution to a problem. In addition, there is no requirement to make a specific AddOn public, meaning that it is possible to keep the "best" AddOns private, giving an even greater advantage to those allowed to utilize it.

    Many players enjoy the opportunity to create content for MMOs. It is a way to be a part of a game's community. Some of the more prolific or notable AddOn creators in games have gained a following, and others have been hired to work on MMOs. For example, T.King, an artist and developer of UI skins for EverQuest, was hired by Sigil to work on Vanguard. Some creators make money from their creations, particularly in Second Life and World of Warcraft.

    UI skins are a sub-category of AddOns which have been available for most of the genre's lifespan. These are modificatiosn which change the way a game's interface art appears on the screen. Skinning allows for recolored UIs, UIs with minimal chrome, and elements of different sizes. A pure skin offers comparatively little advantage to a player using it, with perhaps only slightly more visibility possible, or easier legibility. In some cases UI elements are not optimally configured for colorblind players. Skinning can serve as an accessibility tool, changing the colors of certain elements to promote visibility.

    Some games include no ability to modify the game client, others options to skin, some promote functionality changes for the UI, and yet another group offer varying types and degrees of actual player created content. Each development team will weight the needs of a specific title carefully when making this decision, and it is important to remember that once a feature is added, it is very difficult indeed to take it back.
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    Part Five: Specific AddOns

    In the beginning of the MMO genre it was possible to get lost. EverQuest had very dark nights (for human characters particularly) and offered no on-screen compass, let alone any kind of map or mini-map. Instead players could try to sense direction, which was a skill, or use the /location command repeatedly to determine in which direction they were going. Maps created by talented players were distributed online, and eventually a compass and maps were added to the game client by the developers. Each of these things made the game easier to play.

    As time has moved on, games have added in things like compasses and maps to the default game. Many games from later generations now even include detailed information on where specific creatures are which must be killed for a quest, or the location of an NPC which must be spoken to. Each of these features has offered more and more in the way of convenience. Meaning less time and energy need be spent thinking about what is going on in the game. As a result, more players are now able to enjoy the games. Just as allowing calculators on math exams would result in more people passing tests.

    With the addition of player-created helpers to games, there is a growing tendency to add in functions to make playing the game even easier. In fact, some of the convenience features have been adapted into games as official parts of the default UI. In an effort to explain some of what UI AddOns can add to a game, I've selected a number of very popular World of Warcraft examples which will hopefully serve to show what is gained and lost with the addition of integrated components or an AddOn API.

    Recount
    A meter which tracks the damage per second of a raid, group, or player. It can provide a breakdown of damage done during a fight and show which abilities are being used most, and what is most effective. This is often used for theorycraft, and raid leadership. Without Recount, a parser would need to be used in order to determine optimal rotations, and which characters might be bringing the raid down in average DPS. The easy presence of damage meters in games can lead to excessive boasting and descrimination without cause in the hands of immature or ignorant players. An AddOn like Recount compares unfavorably with a robust parser (see below) in all ways except ease of use. (Which is actually a bonus for avoiding aberrant behavior as described.)

    Omen Threat Meter
    This is an on-screen UI element which tracks the threat being generated by members of a group or raid (or a pet and master) meaning that it will offer feedback on when a character is getting too close to pulling aggro. It is often required by raiding guilds. Without this AddOn players are required to learn to manage their own threat thorough trial and error as well as exploration of their class and item abilities.

    GearScore
    This totals up the item level of gear a character has equipped and displays it in a single number. The higher level gear, the better the score thus. Usually used to set limits for groups and raids, as well as for bragging rights. Does not take into account specifics of set bonuses or item procs. Without this AddOn evaluation of a character's equipment requires knowledge of the class and items. (With the AddOn it does as well, but people often dismiss this fact.)

    Deadly Boss Mods
    A tool for instances (group and raid) which offers up warnings any time a named creature is going to use a specific special ability. A noise fires off and a text announcement is displayed each time one of the conditions in the AddOn is met. It is kept up to date according to the information gleaned from some of the most advanced guilds in the world, meaning that almost everyone who raids has access to all the warnings for all the content they are currently involved in clearing. The lack of this AddOn means needing to understand exactly when to do things without the alarms going off, meaning that most raiding guilds have this on the required AddOn listing.

    Auctioneer
    This AddOn is key to making quick, informed decisions for selling and buying, as well as which loot to keep while in the field and running low on bag space. It allows you to determine at a glance how much an item is worth (roughly) on the market and what it is worth to break it down with the Disenchanting trade skill. It can be set to find deals on auctions about to expire. It keeps a data store for each server you play on, making it possible to know the difference between a stack of Wool on your guild's PvP server and one on the PvE server your other friends play on. This AddOn makes it possible to play the auction house for profit without sitting down to do any analysis of your own. Without this convenience mod, it is much more work (requiring a certain talent or skill) to remember prices and make good speculative purchases.
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    Part Six: Third Party Programs

    While the development company can add in functionality, and AddOn developers may use a provided API to modify the visuals or functions of a game, there is one other way to enhance an MMO. The use of third party programs is a common method for extending the capabilities of a specific game. Some of the most common types of third party programs have been covered here. In some cases, MMOs will incorporate some of these features in the game client.

    Voice Communications
    Typically one of three major pieces of software will be used for group communications. These are Teamspeak and Ventrillo, both client-server applications suitable for persistent use, and Skype, a client application better suited to small group use which is non-persistent in nature. There are other alternatives in many chat clients as well as a few other client-server setups such as Mumble/Murmur. The use of voice communications software saves the need to type into the game client and wait for others to read it. This is generally considered highly useful in situations such as player vs. player combat and player vs. environment grouping or raiding. Some players find the use of voice communications software to be a distraction, or immersion-breaking. Such software is often a requirement (at least listening) for membership in guilds, or participation in certain types of activities within specific guilds. Overlays or AddOns are sometimes used with these programs that cause the display of information from the software on the screen.

    Capture Utilities
    Both for screenshots (such as rapid-fire/intermittent modes) and video capture, such utilities are often used in order to record events experienced in game. The most common program used for this is FRAPS, though a numnber of other utilities exist. Players who are interested in making game trailers, machinima, tutorials, brag-reels, or gag-reels often utilize capture utilities. Some functionality in such programs provides an overlay which displays certain information on the screen.

    Combat Log Parsers
    Like the WoW Recount AddOn detailed above, these programs offer a breakdown of information gathered from the combat log. Before the advent of integrated solutions and AddOns there programs did the number crunching. They can be utilized for breaking down the results of combat in any game which provides a time-stamped combat log, which the majority of MMOs do. Unlike Recount it is possible to store logs and use a parser to analyze them at any time in the future. They are usually used by raid leaders, theorycrafters, and high end raiders, though anyone who has access to a parser (they are generally publicly available) may install it and analyze logs. Some parsers operate with real-time reporting in a second window or via an overlay. Most can parse results available on a networked drive, allowing the parser to be run independently of the game client, saving CPU cycles and memory.

    Hacks and Bots
    Generally prohibited by the EULA of an MMO, these are programs which bend the rules of the game for advantage. Examples include the ability to move more quickly than normal, see through geometry, examine the statistics of items or creatures in detail not available in the UI, etc. Generally players using hacks who are caught are banned.
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    In Closing

    This was a long post. It's well over 5000 words. If you actually made it though, I hereby offer you a virtual medal.

    I would appreciate informed comments on the subjects at hand. I find discussion to be enjoyable, and I hope to have some new thoughts added to what has already been laid out here as a basis.

    Again, I did try to offer positives for viewpoints I personally do not agree with. I did not, no doubt, manage to do it as well as some of the more empassioned supporters would have. I invite you to do so at your leisure.

    And as I mentioned at the beginning, if you want a non-forum version, it will be up on my blog in a little bit.
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    I'll be adding in the sections now. They'll be up in a few minutes.

    I'm also reporting every single one of you just because I'd prefer that your comments come after the entirety of the posts, not because I don't want you to chat in the thread.

    (That'd be hypocritical.)
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    Guys, lets wait for him to finish the thread before posting please. This is going to be beyond amazing.


    Haseno
    "Victory goes to the player who makes the next-to-last mistake."
    I love my comma's, deal with it, chump.

  11. #11
    Champion of Telara Hackiedoodle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Haseno View Post
    Guys, lets wait for him to finish the thread before posting please. This is going to be beyond amazing.
    I'd swear you were his alt account, if it wasn't for the fact that you both post so fast :P
    Last edited by Hackiedoodle; 12-10-2010 at 12:44 PM.
    Krimhilde, Warrior
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  12. #12
    Ascendant Haseno's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hackiedoodle View Post
    I'd swear you were his alt account, if it wasn't for the fast that you both post so fast :P

    Eh, Corwynn and me agree on most subjects, but not all.
    The difference between me and him is he uses the technical aspect and a more tolerant tone and manner in which he writes.
    Me however...not nearly as nice about it. Nor do I really care. Seen to many population waves of "MeMe's" to be tolerant anymore.
    Last edited by Haseno; 12-10-2010 at 12:50 PM.


    Haseno
    "Victory goes to the player who makes the next-to-last mistake."
    I love my comma's, deal with it, chump.

  13. #13
    Rift Team Zann's Avatar
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    We've moved this thread to Off-Topic.

    Please keep posts on-topic, constructive and civil. If this thread becomes a problem, we will close it.

    Thanks.

  14. #14
    Ascendant Apoc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Haseno View Post
    Guys, lets wait for him to finish the thread before posting please. This is going to be beyond amazing.
    Oh I just canít wait for this. It like daggling a bacon strip in front of my dogís lol.

  15. #15
    Ascendant Haseno's Avatar
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    Very good read, and I especially loved parts 1 and 2. There are many sentences in which I wish to respond to, but in all honesty there's no need to do so.

    Also, I don't usually question moderator actions. But this topic was based on the evolution of the genre, which does include Rift. The topic will receive more flames for being in off-topic and thus should of never have been moved. When a much worst topic regarding the issue still remains.


    Haseno
    "Victory goes to the player who makes the next-to-last mistake."
    I love my comma's, deal with it, chump.

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