+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 7 1 2 3 4 5 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 104

Thread: What is with the weapon held backwards in dual-wielding?

  1. #1
    Shadowlander
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    22

    Default What is with the weapon held backwards in dual-wielding?

    I've only seen this previously in the japanese games, and it's always looked stupid to me. I can't imagine that would be very effective in combat. Will all dual-wielding be like this?

  2. #2
    Rift Master armengar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Arkansas
    Posts
    595

    Default

    maybe its some fighting stance they learned, each to their own on it, I sort of like the look

  3. #3
    Soulwalker Akorai's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    17

    Default

    I've never really played a game with this type of duel wield, i couldn't tell you if it would bother me or not.. I guess it's just something different some people will have to get used to

  4. #4
    Rift Disciple Nimsul's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    114

    Default

    May this answer all your questions.

    Edited for additional info

    There is some practicality to it, however it's mostly just flashy when used beyond dagger sized weapons. It's primarily a defensive grip and the larger swing range can produce more power with horizontal strikes at the cost of range. But its primary focus is parrying and getting inside to wreak some damage. One of the reasons for its popularity is how when you hold 2 weapons with a reverse grip, it commonly looks like a pair of mantis forelimbs or scything talons.

    http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/ReverseGrip Enjoy the humorous read

    Some additional text.

    Reverse Knife Grip Technique: Edge Out (RGEO)

    A grip is considered reversed when the blade opposes the thumb. The reverse grip then positions the blade pointing downward in the locked fist position. Edge out means the cutting edge of a single-edged knife is oriented away from the body. This is a traditional reverse grip, because the handle orientation of most knives can accommodate either the traditional forward grip or reverse grip with the palm of the hand in the same location on the handle, along the spine. So, of the reverse grip techniques, this is the most frequently accommodated and the most comfortable for most knife handles.

    The advantages to the Reverse Edge Out grip technique are many. First, unless the elbow is extended and locked straight, the blade cutting edge always faces the enemy, no matter where the hand is located (unless it's behind the knife user!). When the fist moves as in a cross punch, the blade and cutting edge can be raked across the enemy in a slashing motion. Second, like an ice pick, tremendous force can be brought to bear on the point, not only when oriented downward, but when an enemy is behind or beside. Third, the grip technique allows capping (shown in the photo at left) where the thumb (and thus force) is brought to bear on the butt of the knife handle, in this case at the rear bolster. This also increases the security of the knife grip. A fourth advantage of this grip technique is that the knife can be oriented with cutting edge to enemy even when guarding with the forearm. Many of my military clients prefer this grip technique built into their handles. A fifth advantage is that the "elbows bent" position that is usually assumed with this type of grip technique can be more powerful and defensive than an extended and reaching forearm, which is unprotected and may be easily trapped and fractured.

    One of the disadvantages of this grip technique is limited reach. Because the point and edge can not be extended like a forward grip technique, the enemy must be handled at a closer range. A second issue is that deep thrusting moves can usually only be made downward or sideways, not frontally, unless the knife user is on top of his enemy. A third issue is one of trapping; that since the knife is closer to the body, the knife and arm can be pinned with a foot, object, or enemy's hand. Of course, the object pinning the knife is subject to serious damage from the knife, and certainly a bare hand will not be able to maintain pinning without being cut.
    Last edited by Nimsul; 08-20-2010 at 09:25 PM.

  5. #5
    Telaran
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    74

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Noodle View Post
    I've only seen this previously in the japanese games, and it's always looked stupid to me. I can't imagine that would be very effective in combat. Will all dual-wielding be like this?
    It has no pratctical purpose. They do it because it looks cool, or at least they think it does. In reality that kind of grip is inferior to the normal grip.

  6. #6
    Shadowlander Slashur's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    33

    Default

    Starkiller (force unleashed) used a reverse grip (Shien in star wars talk) with one hand for easier deflections both form the front and from behind.
    Think about how the blade dancer who uses this method is the type that dodges and parries blows.

  7. #7
    Champion Entropy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    495

  8. #8
    Champion Entropy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    495

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Azren View Post
    It has no pratctical purpose. They do it because it looks cool, or at least they think it does. In reality that kind of grip is inferior to the normal grip.
    Sorry, but I beg to differ.

    We shall just agree to disagree.

  9. #9
    Sword of Telara Xanax's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    West Coast
    Posts
    785

    Default

    I kind of like it. It looks different, and the animations can be versatile. Nothin but a little black hand slice, no?

  10. #10
    Champion Helspyre's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    506

    Default

    I personally do not like the reverse grip being used, especially with long blades (as has been shown with the blade dancer). I have less of a problem with daggers being used this way, though.
    The Black Company
    Of. By. For.

  11. #11
    Rift Disciple
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    121

    Default

    I does not seem very practical, as it's probably easier to hit yourself accidentally than you hit your opponent. You'd have thought that the pointy end of the sword should be held in the direction of the enemy, and not your own person.

    But, after all, this is fantasy : if some characters can hurl fireballs, it's difficult to argue about the realism of swordplay

    If it looks good, that's good enough !

  12. #12
    Plane Touched Insaneium's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    200

    Default

    I've seen a video of a male character dual-wielding in a tradition way, and videos of female characters dual-wielding in the reverse grip. The reverse grip does have functionality as someone has already covered. It could be a male/female thing, or it could be a class/calling specific thing. Not really sure, but it doesn't matter to me either way.

    http://www.tribegaming.com
    I do not fear the unknown. I welcome it.


  13. #13
    Plane Walker Threather's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    376

    Default

    I decided that this bit of information needed to be re-posted. Reverse grip is very practical, and is actually safer for the wielder than a normal grip. The disadvantage is range. So no, the game developers didn't pick a style that was worthless just for, "show." This is a grip that is very popular in several martial arts; including the U.S. Military.

    Quote Originally Posted by Nimsul View Post
    May this answer all your questions.

    Edited for additional info

    There is some practicality to it, however it's mostly just flashy when used beyond dagger sized weapons. It's primarily a defensive grip and the larger swing range can produce more power with horizontal strikes at the cost of range. But its primary focus is parrying and getting inside to wreak some damage. One of the reasons for its popularity is how when you hold 2 weapons with a reverse grip, it commonly looks like a pair of mantis forelimbs or scything talons.

    http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/ReverseGrip Enjoy the humorous read

    Some additional text.

    Reverse Knife Grip Technique: Edge Out (RGEO)

    A grip is considered reversed when the blade opposes the thumb. The reverse grip then positions the blade pointing downward in the locked fist position. Edge out means the cutting edge of a single-edged knife is oriented away from the body. This is a traditional reverse grip, because the handle orientation of most knives can accommodate either the traditional forward grip or reverse grip with the palm of the hand in the same location on the handle, along the spine. So, of the reverse grip techniques, this is the most frequently accommodated and the most comfortable for most knife handles.

    The advantages to the Reverse Edge Out grip technique are many. First, unless the elbow is extended and locked straight, the blade cutting edge always faces the enemy, no matter where the hand is located (unless it's behind the knife user!). When the fist moves as in a cross punch, the blade and cutting edge can be raked across the enemy in a slashing motion. Second, like an ice pick, tremendous force can be brought to bear on the point, not only when oriented downward, but when an enemy is behind or beside. Third, the grip technique allows capping (shown in the photo at left) where the thumb (and thus force) is brought to bear on the butt of the knife handle, in this case at the rear bolster. This also increases the security of the knife grip. A fourth advantage of this grip technique is that the knife can be oriented with cutting edge to enemy even when guarding with the forearm. Many of my military clients prefer this grip technique built into their handles. A fifth advantage is that the "elbows bent" position that is usually assumed with this type of grip technique can be more powerful and defensive than an extended and reaching forearm, which is unprotected and may be easily trapped and fractured.

    One of the disadvantages of this grip technique is limited reach. Because the point and edge can not be extended like a forward grip technique, the enemy must be handled at a closer range. A second issue is that deep thrusting moves can usually only be made downward or sideways, not frontally, unless the knife user is on top of his enemy. A third issue is one of trapping; that since the knife is closer to the body, the knife and arm can be pinned with a foot, object, or enemy's hand. Of course, the object pinning the knife is subject to serious damage from the knife, and certainly a bare hand will not be able to maintain pinning without being cut.

  14. #14
    Sword of Telara Sylvrin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Phoenix, Az
    Posts
    713

    Default

    Thank you Nimsul, very informative!
    Those who guard nature, guard life itself. Those who defile nature bring death and destruction upon us all.

  15. #15
    Prophet of Telara Ravenwolf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Tasmania AUS
    Posts
    1,052

    Default

    From http://www.jayfisher.com/knife_grip_..._Sizing_Topics Which outlines the reverse grip as being a more Defensive fighting style.

    The Reverse (Defensive) Knife Grip Techniques

    The reverse knife grip technique occurs when the knife blade and point oppose the thumb; the direction is opposite of the forward grip. Also called Icepick (WW2 era), stabbing (colloquial), reverse grip techniques have got a lot of attention over human time, not all of it good. It's funny to note that in the past decades, the reverse grip was considered a sign of a novice, popularized by knife murder dramas where an inexperienced attacker would grab a knife and poke wildly downward. People trained in the elegant and proper use of swords and parrying daggers traditionally used the forward grip, so to them, this was the only refined way to hold an edged weapon. Since refined is proper, all other grip techniques must be improper.
    There is no proper or correct way to hold a knife. The human hand has amazing ability to accommodate a wide variety of positions and holds, and since every person is different, many grip techniques are used.

    The elegant, proper, and distinguished methodology of fighting for your life has, thankfully, passed. If you are in CQB, there are no rules, no restrictions, and no limitations to your methods you might use to save your very life. If reverse grip techniques work for you, use them. Like the other grip techniques, they have their distinctive types, advantages, and disadvantages..
    Opps i posted too late lol someone beat me to the punch!

+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 7 1 2 3 4 5 ... LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts